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Artificial intelligence (AI) tools and predictive models are now playing a growing role in health care delivery due to both advances in the technology and increasing availability of electronic data. However, common examples of AI discussed in health care media focus on the potential to treat disease or replace a medical professional’s expertise.

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What can AI help with today, and where can we expect a big impact in the future?

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If you look closer at what AI is and where it is now, you’ll realize that health care problems are complex and AI is evolving in what it can do. Understanding what AI can do today with an eye to the future is important in assessing its value in both the administrative and clinical sides of health care delivery.  

Two new mini-podcasts featuring both an OptumLabs expert and partner share fresh perspectives on where AI can add value in medicine and health care administration. 

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FEATURED PODCASTS

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Deep Learning: Opportunities in health care operations 

Listen to the podcast

Paul Bleicher, MD, PhD, CEO of OptumLabs, discusses how deep learning works and how it can be used to improve health care administrative processes.

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Machine Learning: Opportunity for the clinical setting and consumer

Listen to the podcast

Atul Butte, MD, PhD, distinguished professor and chief data scientist, University of California, shares his perspective on the applied use of AI in medicine, the responsibility to leverage the data, and the growing voice of consumers.

 

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The future of AI in health care

Explore insights from the OptumLabs® Research & Translation Forum.

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Evolution of AI in health care

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  • The AI journey from theory to mainstream has evolved in waves. While health care may see AI as an abstract concept, technology capabilities have already entered their second wave of evolution.

    The roots of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies go back to 1950, when Alan Turing suggested that machines could be designed to think. Current applications of AI would likely be as unrecognizable to Turing now as today’s physics classes would be to Sir Isaac Newton.

    Perhaps Turing would still recognize the Wave zero technology principles that allowed a computer to beat reigning world chess champion Garry Kasparov in 1997. Wave one brought natural language processing (NLP) and other examples of machine learning. Now we’re in the middle of Wave two,  fueled by vast amounts of data and a big boost in compute power to use it. So what’s next?

    Continue reading: AI will be a sea change in health care

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  • Let’s start with what it’s not. AI isn’t a singular technology but an umbrella term that includes using machine learning, deep learning and natural language processing (NLP), among other methods, to perform smart tasks we often associate with the human mind such as learning and reasoning.

    Continue reading: How is AI working for health care?

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  • There’s plenty of hype around artificial intelligence and its potential to transform health care. But how can CIOs and IT leaders use AI to solve real business problems?

    When thinking about using AI for your business, it’s essential that you don’t start with the technology and then force it into a solution. The key is to partner with the business leaders to understand their most important needs. Then you can develop the technology strategy to address those needs.

    Continue reading: Lessons learned — AI in health care

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