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 on-demand webinar

Optimizing care management with faster data and richer analytics

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Brittany Turman:

Hello, everyone, and thank you for joining today's webinar, optimizing care management with faster data and richer analytics. My name is Brittany Turman with Optum, and I will be your host today. Before we begin, please note the following housekeeping items. At the bottom of your audience console are multiple application widgets that you can use to customize your experience. If you have any questions during the webcast, you can click on the Q&A widget at the bottom of your screen to submit a question. We do capture all questions and we'll be providing follow up to questions as appropriate. If you experience any technical difficulty, please click on the Help widget. It covers technical issues. You can expand your slide area by clicking on the maximize on the top right of the slide window, or by dragging the bottom right corner of the slide window.

Brittany Turman:

There is a survey widget which you can use at the end of the webcast to provide us with feedback on today's presentation. We are offering some additional opportunities for you to engage with the audience console today. We invite you to download the optimum performance analytics facts sheet located at the top right just for you. For also a chance to register for our upcoming session maximizing government program performance [inaudible 00:01:16] on Thursday, December 10, 2PM. Eastern. You can find that link to register in the upcoming webinars with it to the right of your slide deck. If you're attending today's session, you may also like the related resources located directly below the registration link. We have several resources there to choose from and we invite you to go through all of them.

Brittany Turman:

To obtain the session [inaudible 00:01:36] success series, you can put them on link in the [inaudible 00:01:38] end. And if you'd like follow up specific to today's event, we do have a contact us widget located to the left of your slide deck directly below the bios of our speakers that we have with us today. Additionally, this presentation does use streaming audio, you may listen to the audio through your computer speakers or phone [inaudible 00:01:58] or system performance. Please be sure to shut down and you need to [inaudible 00:02:00]. Facilitating today's session we have Sam Sterns with analytics, Optum insight. I'm going to go ahead and turn it over to him, Sam.

Sam Sterns:

Great. Well, thank you. Good afternoon, everyone. And thank you for joining today's webinar on Optimizing Care Management with Analytics. My name is Sam Sterns, I lead product management for Optum's payer analytics solutions. And today I'm joined by two of my colleagues from Optum advisory services, Deb Lang, and Ali Shirvani Mahdavi, who are experts on consumer and care management analytics. And we're excited to share what we're seeing in the market with you. In today's presentation, we'll cover three topics. First, we'll start off by summarizing some of the key trends that we see influencing our clients care management strategy.

Sam Sterns:

Then we'll talk about why we believe member engagement is so central to deliver effective care management programs. And then third, Deb and Ali will share Optum's best practice model for engaging members and care management using analytics. We'll have time to open up at the end for Q&A. So please share any questions you have in the chat box during the presentation. Let's dive in. So at Optum we partner with a wide range of payers to improve care management performance. And we see several macro trends in the market that together are making care management more complex.

Sam Sterns:

First, think of government programs. These lines of business are major sources of growth for many plans, and they have distinct regulatory requirements. A number of our clients are investing to build out their term management capability to give them greater control to improve outcomes for the strategic population. A second factor is clinical complexity. Factors like specialty pharmacy, complex conditions, and behavioral health integration are driving needs for new approaches beyond a focus on the classic model focusing on the big five chronic conditions. The third and fourth trends that we've seen a lot describe how the organization and delivery of clinical programs is changing and becoming more complex.

Sam Sterns:

For example, in many diabetes care arrangements, health plans are delegating to management activities for chronic members to providers. And that creates some questions or challenges release integration across the payer versus provider to create a seamless experience. Similarly, digital health has presented a number of promising opportunities to improve care member experience. But the current state reality for digital health is fragmented with niche solutions targeting specific conditions. And that makes it harder to create an overall strategy that drives sustained impact, particularly for your employer groups. Against this backdrop, we see our clients seeking new ways to improve the performance of their care management programs to better meet the needs of their members, and to reach targets for quality affordability. And one of the most common questions we see from our clients is how to improve engagement. So with that, I'm going to turnover to Ali, who will talk about why engagement is so important to care management.

Ali Shirvani:

Thank you, Sam. And thank you everyone for joining us today. So in this section, we're going to talk a little bit about the challenges that everybody on this call faces. And also some of the ways we are thinking about kind of alleviating some of those issues. This bigger should not look surprising to anyone. This is what we see within Optum. This is what we see when we work with our clients. And this is what you see in general in terms of what term referred to, which is lack of engagement on the part of members when it comes to care management programs.

Ali Shirvani:

Generally speaking, depending on the workforce, you have, depending on the regulatory obligations you have, depending on your population characteristic, we identify about 20% of the population for care management, from there about 25% drop off because they can't be reached, either unable to reach or they hang up or they're just can't be reached. Even once you reach them and other half bought off, because they refuse to engage for a variety of reasons. Whether it be because they don't understand what the program is about, they don't have time, or they're just simply not interested. And then once you engage them, you have another 20% drop off, based on the fact that some of those members never complete the program or they don't get as much out of it. And hence it doesn't result in a change behavior on the part of the member.

Ali Shirvani:

So it's a significant issue in terms of not only engaging the population, but sustaining the engagement, and also resulting in a change behavior. So that's the challenge. One of the ways we have started kind of addressing some of these engagement issues is by starting to think about members in a more holistic way. And which means not only thinking about their clinical risk, which is obviously Paramount, and critical to identifying the right population to involve with the care management program, but really also identifying non clinical characteristics, like social determinants of health. And which includes things, again, most people live majority of their lives outside of healthcare system, and how they live, how they behave, where they live, how they grow, their level of support, housing, food, transportation, financial resources, all that impacts the way they interact with the healthcare system and the care program.

Ali Shirvani:

And there's a lot of research both internally and externally, that shows that it can be up to 80% of healthcare outcomes and utilization, and really level of engagement can be based on STH characteristics. And so that's one of the ways we have been thinking about how to improve engagement is just by thinking about members in a more holistic way. And really acknowledging that this isn't just about healthcare, this is about their lives, and how they interact and what their needs are both clinically and non clinically.

Ali Shirvani:

And we also know that, among everything else, COVID is exasperating some of these issues from a variety of perspective. Because of obviously, some of the economic impacts of COVID, you're going to have more people with housing security issues, whether it's because they have lost their jobs, because they're getting evicted. But it's because they're spending a lot more time on housing, or money on housing. It's exacerbating that issue. And we know that there is a significant relationship between housing and engagement and healthier outcome. Same thing with food security. We know that there are some issues that are exaggerated by COVID around again, financial resource around not having access to healthy food, not having, the health literacy to really know how that impacts the virus conditions. Perhaps the most important one, though is the third circle, which is around social isolation.

Ali Shirvani:

I think everybody has read about the fact that especially among older adults, there's been significant issues with people interacting with their loved ones because they fear of the virus spread and again, we know social isolation that there is a significant relationship between it and care outcomes and healthier outcomes and just level of engagement. And then finally, and I think again, this has been plenty in the news that we also know that people are having significantly different outcomes based on some of their racial and economic characteristics, socio economic characteristics. And that people who are already vulnerable before COVID hit are now even more vulnerable, both in terms of the rate at which they get infected, but also the outcome of the infection.

Ali Shirvani:

So STOH is exposing some of the things we already knew and exasperating some of the things you already realized about STOH, and its impact on clinical outcome. So that's one of the ways you're thinking about engagement, both in the age of COVID, but in general around care management. So I'm going to pause here and pass it over to Stern he has a poll question for you guys.

Sam Sterns:

Great. So the first question we have for folks in the audience, as you think about engagement, what is the greatest challenge that your plan faces? I'll give everyone about 45 seconds to respond. All right. So looking at the results here, by far, the biggest challenge is the ability to reach members, Deborah, Ali, is any reactions to that? Is that consistent with what you guys typically see.

Ali Shirvani:

It is I mean, I think I'm able to reach obviously, is every client we work with, there's always that exasperation that they have out of date phone numbers, or the person doesn't pick up the phone, and things like that. So that is definitely something we see a lot and it is one of the more exasperating issues. We do think that there are opportunities for even using some analytics to identify the most recent phone numbers that somebody may be have available, you have some underlying that they could do that. But I think the other two that stand out is obviously B and D, which is the stuff we've been talking about, which is STOH barriers, which we know has impact on engagement, but also the ability to stratify around engagement level. Any such stuff?

Deb:

Yeah, I was thinking the same thing, I think the stratifying the population finding the right population, so that if you have that moment when they actually do pick up the phone that you're talking about something that is truly relevant to them should help with see, to some extent, I know some of it is due to bad, phone numbers, addresses, whatever. But I do think that all three of those are very much tied together.

Sam Sterns:

Great. So with that, why don't we go to the next section. And drop what statistics steps through that components that's how we think about our best in classroom management engagement.

Deb:

Sounds great, thank you. Okay, so we're starting to think about how to put together a best in class care management strategy. These are the components that we often like to suggest, and it takes all of these in concert with each other to really come to best in class solution. So the first step, probably one of the most critical ones is to spend the time to strategize and design a program that really fits your populations needs. And this is where we have to call on all of our tools in our clinical analytics toolkit, in order to look at data that we have about each person from a number of different lenses.

Deb:

Once we have design in mind, next step is to put that into play. So to use stratification methodologies to make sure that we are finding those members tagging them, putting them into the right queues. One version of this that we feel is best in class at this point, is what we refer to as Optum as an impactful care management model. And the value of that is the word impactful. So we're not only looking for those people who have clinical risk factors, but also trying to find those members who have action that can be taken now, and also have the desire. So we'll see how their needs and wants come together in that model in just a moment.

Deb:

We also rely heavily on a enhanced member profile. This is a way that allows our frontline staff, our nurses, our care coordinators, social workers, at the quickest point of view possible to understand everything else that's going on with the member all at once so that they can efficiently make some clinical decisions and start to put a care path together for that member before they begin their outreach. The next piece is okay, how am I going to find these members? So this kind of goes back to that poll question a second ago. But here's where we can actually use some of the social determinant data that Ali was just speaking about, to really understand how to get members to engage. What is the best modality for outreaching to them?

Deb:

So using some of that data to put together a better plan of action to get that engagement going. And last but not least, and probably one of the most important parts and something that should be actually part of our design, all the way back in the beginning is how are we going to measure success? So there's a number of different ways that you might go about this, different types of metrics, whether they be around the actions that have been taken to the actual operational measurements, but there should also hopefully be some clinical outcome component to this as well. So we'll give you some ideas around how we suggest you go about measuring success of a care management program.

Deb:

But first, we have to think about our design. When we do this, we really want to pull together any and all data that we have on our members, we need to go beyond their traditional medical and pharmacy claims data that most of us have to really start thinking about additional clinical elements, even if those are as simple as bringing in lab results. But even more so is to think about all of the social data that we can collect on our members, whether those be from assessments that have already been done on existing members, or through more automated approaches, which Ali was speaking about, where we can use consumer data to better understand, though, the where, how, and the where, and how we live our lives. So when you put all of that together and can use that as part of your methodologies, you really end up with something that is enhanced beyond where most care management program designs are today.

Deb:

Let's get into this impactful care management model a bit more. So in a traditional approach we're definitely are relying heavily on medical and pharmacy claims. And often we have much more of a disease centric approach. And what we're suggesting here is using this impactful case management model, we really want to turn it around and maybe make it member centric. We want to utilize all of those different points of view, medical, behavioral, social characteristics to truly understand the needs and the wants for each member. The goal also is to create efficiencies and effectiveness by making it objective, so we will leave less subjectivity in the end to really try to hone in on not only which program the member might be, might be best in a rolling, but also to give the staff members, your operational staff the exact details as to why they ended up in that program queue.

Deb:

So we're trying to make it so that it's very visible, and easy to understand what the next best action is. Here's how this model works. It is designed to have three distinct domains included in it. The first domain is assessing the members clinical risk. We have a series of about 30 or so different, distinct triggers that we look for. For each member, each one of those triggers has its own individual weight. And once we understand which of those triggers the member hit, we're able to sum up those weights and ultimately set the member into a clinical risk level. Typically, we do it as a high moderate low, but that is flexible and we can set up, however best fits your population.

Deb:

The next domain, I would suggest is one of the more important ones and maybe more evolved in some of the pro traditional programs. And this is where we're actually looking to see how actionable is the member, though similar lead similar to the clinical risk, there's about 30 or so actionable opportunities that we assess for every member with every refresh of the data. These actual opportunities range from gaps in care, to places where there might be misuse of health care services, over use, new situations, a new diagnosis of diabetes, all kinds of factors that we're looking for across the medical and behavioral and social domains. Once each one of those is assessed, again, they're scored, weighted, and then the weights are added up to come up with an impact able opportunity level of high, moderate low.

Deb:

Third, and definitely not least, is the ability to add on a stratification or a prioritization based on propensity to engage. So using our consumer analytics, social determinants of health results, we're able to assess on a couple of different indices to tell whether or not a member is likely to first of all, even talk to you on the phone. So that's a big one that goes back to the, how do I reach these people? The second domain within the propensity to engage is to say, would they if they were offered a program, what's the likelihood they're actually going to enroll in it?

Deb:

And thirdly, we'd like to understand within this composite score, whether or not the member has the is likely to take care of themselves. Do they have good health ownership already. So with those three things in mind, we are able to derive a high moderate and low leveling of their engagement likelihood to engage. Here's some actual results from the tactical care management model. This was one of our Medicaid plans. But it runs well across Medicare Advantage, commercial plans. And the beauty of it ultimately too is there is a lot of flexibility in the way we set it up. So we start with this base components, I was talking about those 30 or so clinical risk factors and actual opportunities, and flex those once we understand a bit more about your population.

Deb:

The way it works, though, is the first thing we do is go through and assess to using those 30 or so clinical risk factors we're along the clinical risk scale, do each of these member lie. Though, for this 214,000 member population, you can see about 1%, or 2300 of these members were categorized as high, another 3%, moderate, around 9% were low. And by design, a large portion of the population doesn't have any of these super complex clinical risk factors. This helps us to hone in very quickly on the whom might have the biggest needs. If we take it to step two, the second pass through the data. Next, we're going to look to see how actionable are these members that we intersect the clinical risk score down the rows with the actual opportunity leveling across the columns.

Deb:

So for instance, for the high clinical risk the 2380, you can see 995 of those members are not only high clinically, clinical risk wise, but they also have high actionability. The beauty of this too, though, is also if you look on that high row, you also have a very small number, but some members who have no actionable opportunities at this point in time. And that's also valuable to know because those numbers likely don't need immediate outreach, they might need more of a surveillance plan for the time being. Again upon a future refresh of this data, they might start to move up to low or some other level but at the moment, they seem to appear to be stable and getting the care they need in the community.

Deb:

So if I take my high highs is a starting place, a natural starting place, I can take the third step which is to then prioritize these members based on their propensity to engage. So here you have the 995 high highs. And you can see of those 110 appear to be highly likely to engage if we were to outreach to them and offer them to enroll in the program. It's important just as important to understand who is likely to engage as to who is not. So the 122 members in this high high group that have low propensity to engage, that's where we might want to take a different approach. Maybe it's a different channel of communication, or it's a different intervention styles that might fit them better.

Deb:

All in all, we go on to the next slide, here's a little bit of our testing that we did as we were building this model out. So this is showing us when you have that clinical risk by impact of opportunities, so the high highs through the low lows, you can see that there are definitive deltas between the type of members that are being captured in these categorizations. We found this to be the case in many of our clients data, and we're also beginning to get some true ROI analysis that are coming in from our clients saying that yes, we are having much better success in finding the right numbers and engaging them based on this impactful case management model.

Deb:

That brings us to the next step. So we've found the right numbers. And now we want to proceed and get these informations in the hands of our clinical staff. So one thing that we feel is super important is to make sure that we are presenting data in a easy to use format that is quick to read gives you all the important components, while still allowing for drill throughs to more detailed data such as raw claims data. What we've experienced is that many data managers are spending a lot of time logging into multiple systems, maybe one system to go see lab results and other system to go see claims data yet another to see the enrollment information about the member.

Deb:

And our goal here is to pull that all together into a single simple page view, like I said, with drill through capabilities to go into the much more detailed information as needed, or point forward elements from the social determinant world, as well as the results of their program definitions, exactly what the analytics have said their needs are, what are their major gaps, the ones that we should be worried about. Who should be the suggested lead for their care? As well as the doctors they're seeing out in the community, and even beginning to suggest what the care plan goal and interventions might be. Ali, I'm going to turn it over to you to talk about engagement.

Ali Shirvani:

Thank you, Deb. So Deb covered up too far. So Deb covered the first three of the five areas of our approach to more efficient care management and more strategic way of thinking about it. I'm going to cover a course and said. I think this one probably resonates a lot given the answers you get to the question, which is just simply where do you find these members to engage? If they don't pick up the phone, if you don't have the right phone number for them. If when they do pick up the phone, they hang up, what do you do? And the first place we start is that the universe of engagement with members needs to be expanded, right?

Ali Shirvani:

It's not just about looking through the database and seeing the phone number and picking up the phone. There are a lot of different ways to identify the characteristics of the population, some of which we've been talking about, I think Deb mentioned propensity to engage, which comes in many different flavors in the model that we build. One is propensity to engage in a kid management model, which is what's the likelihood that somebody will say yes, which helps us reprioritize the queue, but we have a propensity to engage around different channels of communication is somebody more likely to talk to you on the phone? Is somebody more likely to work with you on a digital.

Ali Shirvani:

With COVID and telehealth blowing up what's the likelihood that somebody is going to engage with you through telehealth communication. So that is one area is just really identifying that most opportunistic channels of communication. The other one is really working with other resources. And through different venues that the members interact with the payer and the system and the provider really, to identify what else you could use. Do they belong in community services that you could reach out to them through those resources? If they have an interaction with other parts of your organization, what that interaction look like?

Ali Shirvani:

And really using every available data set, and every available interaction point, and also all the STOH stuff that we've been talking about. Do they have housing issues? And if they do, would they have engaged with a housing program, or would Could you put them in front of a housing program, and that could be your first level of interaction with them, that would get their attention. Again, in a very targeted way, because obviously, that you probably couldn't provide housing for everybody who's out there, or you can't connect into every program that's out there. But just identifying those most relevant whole person views and data points, to really identify what's the best way to engage that person. And I think the enhanced profile sheet that Deb showed in the previous slide is really the first place to start right.

Ali Shirvani:

We can use ICM to identify who to target and we can use the profile to identify how to target this. And then see can find really identifies the method by which you can target them through whatever channel, through whatever resources through whatever past interactions we have had with them. And the other thing we know from a lot of what we have done, is the fact that people's engagement level is very much impacted by their past experiences with the healthcare system, or even more importantly, with the providers. And so if had to have had those experiences, and their expectations of those experiences, all impacted future experiences. So again, having a very good understanding of what those experiences looked like, what the interactions look like, and what kind of outcomes they had and how they were impacted by their STOH characteristics.

Ali Shirvani:

But what really helps you understand why somebody is not going to pick up the phone? Why somebody is going to hang up the phone after they do pick it up? Why somebody is not going to complete the program? And all of this sounds like a lot of work, like oh, my god, you're going to go through all this just because we worried about... But as you saw, I mean, when you go from, you have 6% engagement, and you spend most of your time just banging your head against the wall, it really becomes a very important way of engaging that population. And not only just to engage them, but to improve outcomes, because the other thing we know from the work that we have done is that by acknowledging some of these underlying characteristics, clinical and non clinical, and addressing them, you're going to get better outcomes.

Ali Shirvani:

It's not just about completing the program, it's about change behavior, which was at the tail end of what we first started here. So this is where the seek and find members to engage comes in. It's just having a holistic view of the universe that is out there that you can use and the data associated with them and the interactions that you have to better identify how to engage them the channels to engage them through, and the best way to reach them through partners or through community resources, or whatever the case may be. So that is seeking find, which was fourth. And now for the final one, which is the KPIs, right?

Ali Shirvani:

At the end of the day, none of this matters much if you don't know if you're being successful, in actually making a difference in both level of engagement. But more importantly, and I think everybody in this call probably appreciates this is some real utilization and cost KPIs that will have a significant impact on, your bottom line, but also on the well being of your populations that you serve. And this is a sample list and I'm not going to exhaust the list here.

Ali Shirvani:

But we really, we work with our clients to kind of identify what are the most important KPIs. Eventually, essentially, most of the time, it ends up being reducing utilization whether it's admission readmission, or avoidable ER use, and you reducing unit cost, there may be others and maybe quality improvement, which is obviously a huge deal. It's a population service, Lessing Medicare Advantage program or Medicaid, pay for performance type situation. And then from there, you want to become as specific as you want, whether it's what are the levers that you can pull to actually reduce utilization and reduce costs? What are the factors that would keep the patients healthy going along? What are the factors that goes into reducing relapses from acute conditions, again, sample others.

Ali Shirvani:

And then sample strategy. Whether it's prior authorization, whether it's concurrent review, wellness, preventive programs, end of life programs. And again, one of the big things we always also work with our clients is to really understand the regulatory requirements of the states you're in. So if there are specific segments of the population that have to fall in [inaudible 00:35:37] complex, then what are the implications of that in your workforce constraints, or given the level of engagement you have. So, again, sample strategy, and then at the end of the day, we really want to create a holistic, but measurable set of metrics, that allows you to see before and after.

Ali Shirvani:

The simplest one that we always look at is obviously, from a workforce perspective is improvement in effectiveness and efficiency. How well does your workforce, how many patients do they serve, how engaged they are, and how effective they are in engaging with the pipe patient population, but there may be a lot of other ones, and depending on your priorities, and depending on the populations that you serve.

Ali Shirvani:

But we think that again, this kind of creates that whole person care approach, which started with and which was, again, start with a person in a whole person approach, clinical, non clinical STOH behavioral RX, etc. Stratify the population in our case, we use our example of the impact of a care management model, which we have found to be very effective, and not only identifying the people in the is need, but most impactful and also the is likely to engage. The member profile is really an effective tool to put in front of the care team. So when they finally find that person that they're engaging with, they actually talk to them in the language that resonates with them, right? At the end of the day, because it is, the more the care team can understand some of the underlying reason that a member is not interacting with them or is not interested in the program by addressing some of those non clinical needs, the more likely it is that they will say, "Oh, this is maybe something I'm interested in."

Ali Shirvani:

Obviously, we talked about seek and find, have a holistic approach around it, both from a data perspective, but also from a partner perspective, also from an internal perspective. And then obviously have the ongoing measurement and KPIs to make sure that you're actually seeing the results you want to see and seeing the ROI that you want to see and seeing the improvement in effectiveness and efficiency that you want to see. So this wraps up this, we have one last poll question, and then we're going to open it up for Q&A. And on the protocol question, I'm going to pass it back to Sam.

Sam Sterns:

Thanks, Ali. So now that we've taken you through the five components, I wanted to touch with the audience, what was the first step you might take to address that, your ability to target and engage members in your career management programs? Now getting up maybe about 30 seconds to respond, so we get all the answers out.

Sam Sterns:

All right, it looks like candies response. Number E, finding ways to better engage the members. And number C, where the top two responses both with a third of the response. Deb, Ali, any comments there? Does that make sense? Or it can be quick reactions to the photo.

Ali Shirvani:

I guess I am a little surprised by D didn't get any responses. But that's understandable. Because we have seen some really good effective ways that having an NS number profile really helps get better engagement, right? So that may fall under, identifying ways to better engage members in that sense of the word and obviously see very much goes back to the initial poll questions around the fact that getting people to answer the phone and unable to reach and all that stuff that connects back to it. So no.

Deb:

Yeah, nothing super surprising here to me either. I think these answers are well entwined with each other. So doing one probably helped another out anyway. Yeah, this looks good. So it looks like most of you has a solid strategy for your ID strap modeling. But at the same time, others might be looking for wrapping in a more whole person care approach, which those two kind of go hand in hand as well. And then the Yeah, seeking, not surprising and engaging. So this is, again, where I do feel the social determinant indices that we have available can definitely help in that arena.

Ali Shirvani:

Yeah, and I think that [crosstalk 00:41:15].

Sam Sterns:

Thank you.

Ali Shirvani:

I was just going to say that, I think at that Deb's point, that they are very interconnected. And having that linear feel to the five strategies might give the impression like they are distinctly different from each other. They all work hand in hand, and it's actually more like a booth than it is, you end up stop once you figure out how to measure because obviously, there's always room for improvement. But yeah, there's definitely interconnections between all those areas. [silence 00:43:33].

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Leverage analytics to improve care management

Learn valuable insights on how to optimize care management with faster data and richer analytics.

Health plans require a more holistic view of the members and communities they serve to better understand their health care needs, especially those with multiple chronic conditions.

With a focus on integrating claims, clinical data and social determinants of health, enriching them with prospective and retrospective analytics, and leveraging analytic expertise to put them to work, health plans can enhance the impact of care management activities to improve positive member outcomes and overall financial performance.

Optum helps health plans apply analytics to increase the speed and accuracy of care management insights and to strengthen collaboration with providers to recommend proactive, appropriate interventions.

Join us for this webinar to learn how the tailored solutions, expert services and powerful technology within Optum Performance Analytics can help you.